Pelicar Demo Kit

If you would like a word document version of this, get The Pelicar Demo Kit in Microsoft Word 97 format. The pre-generated sample characters mentioned below are currently being converted to a more presentable state. However, we think you'd learn more by rolling-up your own though. :) By the magic of time travel, here's The Pelicar Demo Kit in Adobe Acrobat format. Also, the Pregenerated Characters mentioned in the Demo are now available separately in Adobe Acrobat format as well. If you don't have it, get the Adobe Acrobat Reader.


Pelicar

This pamphlet is design to assist you in running a demo of Pelicar™. We suggest having four to six players and setting aside four to five hours. Here at Pharaoh Games, we have found that the easiest way to teach and to show someone the Pelicar™ system, is to have them generate a character. However, if you do not have (or want to spend) the time, pre-generated characters are included. Below is an expanded step-by-step process for generating a character while explaining the core rules. Reading through this section a couple times should give you a firm grasp of the game mechanics as well. We have also added certain elements which are key to the game mechanics. All you need to demonstrate a session of Pelicar™ is a copy of the OGB (Official Game Book), 3d10 and a character sheet. There are sample character sheets provided in Appendices C and D of the OGB. Enjoy!

Creating A Character

  1. Based on past experience in other games (none required), perhaps a whim, or an adventurous mind, choose the profession you wish to play. See PROFESSIONS, page 4. Conquerors are the only non-spell-casting profession. Table Profession.6, page 7, illustrates what types of spells are cast by each profession, as well as a few other handy figures.

    Note: Character diversity within the different professions is handled through the skills system. Any profession can become a thief, sage, alchemist, merchant, etc. In fact, professions can cross train to some degree through advanced skills. For example, a conqueror could learn spell-use. See Aperçu, page 39.

  2. Based on the chosen profession, look over the races carefully. Choose one suitable to the character you envision. See RACES, page 8. Though some races are better suited to certain professions than others there are no restrictions.

Note: Any race can be any profession and there are no racial level restrictions. People are loving the new races, you’ll probably have a lot of Tigara.

  1. Now, determine the character’s attribute scores. To resolve these, roll eight sets of 3d10. As each set is rolled, change the lowest die into a ten (10), so that you are generating numbers between 12 and 30. For example, you roll an 8, a 9, and a 2. Change the 2 into a 10. This makes your rolls, an 8, a 9, and a 10, leaving you a total raw score of 27. The resultant numbers are your character’s eight raw attribute scores. They should be noted somewhere until all the rolls are finalized. The player can arrange the eight scores any way he or she chooses. Now match these scores with attributes as you see fit. Racial adjustments and limits should be taken into account. The number written on the sheet should be the raw score modified by racial bonuses. Now, list any bonuses your attributes give your character, in the spaces provided, next to each score. See ATTRIBUTES, page 10.

Note: The score range of a d10 is 1 to 10; thus, a zero on the dice counts as ten. Furthermore, when using percentile scores, the range is between 1 and 100. For further explanation about dice score in the Pelicar™ system refer to page ii in the OGB.

  1. Now it is time to determine the character's health. First determine the character’s Base Health. Table Profession.6, page 7, will list the standard base by profession. To the standard base add any Stamina modifiers; these adjustments can be found in table Attribute.2, page 11. This number is your Base Health. Your character is guaranteed this many points with each level of advancement. Lastly, roll a d10 and add the result to your Base Health. For instance, a warden’s standard base is 9. Such a character with a 28 Stamina would gain a +2 health modifier, making his Base Health 11. At first level their health would be 11 + d10. Upon making second level the character would gain another 11 + d10 (unless along the way their Stamina score had changed).

Note: We recommend that characters be generated at fourth level for demonstration purposes. The quickest way to determine the total health for the above character at fourth level would be 44 + 4d10.

  1. Next, calculate the character’s defense. There are four components. First is the base, which is the character’s Reflex score doubled. Second, add any bonus derived from a Reflex score defense modifier, assuming the character’s Reflex score is high enough. Third, one’s defense is modified by level and profession. These adjustments are listed in the Profession.6 table. The level modifier is added in for each level attained. For example, a fourth level conqueror would gain his defense modifier (+4) for his profession, multiplied by his level, leaving a total level modifier of +16. The total of one’s base, reflex, and level modifiers is the character's touch defense. Touch defense is a measure of how difficult it is to touch, to grab or to get a firm grasp upon the character. In spells that require touch, this score must be matched or bettered on an attack roll. The fourth and final component of defense is armor. See COMBAT EQUIPMENT, Armor, page 17. Adding the armor bonus to touch defense will give the character’s total defense. This is a measure of how hard it is to deliver a damaging blow to the character. The two slots marked special are for any magic the character might pick up during the course of a campaign. Further explanation of magical defenses can be found of page 151 of the OGB.

Note: You may wish to wait until a bit more of the character’s history and/or financial status is determined before adding in the armor component of defense. At the same time, this demo is designed for fourth level characters; most armor is affordable to a successful fourth level adventurer.

Next comes the skills. With only eight professions, one might conclude that Pelicar™ is not a system capable of supporting diverse characters. This is far from the truth! Weapon skills are structured to accommodate any vision of a warrior: defensive, offensive, finesse, savage, range, melee, tricky or straight to the point…any style can be built. Trade skills are where the sheet of numbers becomes a character. Over a hundred skills can be utilized to round out a character. Many purely adventuring skills are available, such as backstab, mounted fighting, and stealth. But through the skills any character can become a sage, thief, or alchemist. Also skills such as brewing, diplomacy and musical instrument can add that needed quirk to that special character.

  1. Determine your character’s financial status and ancestral skills. See table Money.4, page 15, and table Skills.1, page 22. The Arbiter may modify these charts based on the campaign world. We left the idea of a character’s social class intentionally vague so that an Arbiter and player will not feel locked into a certain type-cast. Rolls in these two categories can be used to determine social status for those interested. Obviously two high rolls would indicate upper class, low rolls lower class, and mixed or average rolls somewhere in between.

Note: For demonstration purposes the financial status roll is primarily used to give a possible bonus to the ancestral skill roll. By fourth level, a character will have standard adventuring equipment, a few weapons, and armor, regardless of rolls. That is, unless the Arbiter has something special planned! Unless the roll is very bad, 0-30, the character may have a mount. If the roll is 90 or higher you may let the character have a magical device, either chosen by you or rolled randomly. See page 151. We suggest the Arbiter choose the item, as some items can be rather powerful, and difficult attain by the time a character reaches fourth level.

An ancestral skill is what the character learned before he started adventuring. It may be something he picked up himself or a family business (to which he may not even admit). All intelligent, social, zero-level beings have one ancestral skill available to them. Thus exists the skilled zero-level working class. There are three slots for ancestral skills. This does not mean the character gets three rolls, merely that some rolls constitute more than one skill and we allowed space for them. For example, ( 49 - 53 ) Rogue: Foraging, Gambling, and Pickpocket 15%..

  1. Generalized fighting is already written in as your initial weapon skill. It is mandatory. Essentially it teaches a character the basics of fighting. The bonuses +5 to attack, +˝ point to damage apply to any attack a character makes. This includes swords, rocks, claws, bows, tables, etc. The character gains new weapon skills based on his profession. Table Profession.6 will show this progression. A conqueror gains a new weapon skill every level; thus, he may chose his next weapon skill at first level.

Note: At fourth level, conquerors will have a total of six weapon skills (one will be the initial generalized fighting and one will be the free parry gained at first level; see PROFESSIONS, Conqueror, page 4). Battle priests, wardens and warlocks will have a total of three weapon skills; the rest will have only two.

There are two types of weapon skills, primary and complementary. Primary weapon skills are used for standard combat maneuvers. Of the primary skills, three are offensive and one is defensive. Complementary skills train a character how to use non-conventional fighting techniques.

The three offensive skills of the primary weapon skills are arranged in a step system. The first, as mentioned above is generalized fighting, +5 to attack and +˝ to damage. This gives a bonus with any attack style: a bow, fist, sword, chair…anything! The second step is classified fighting. The bonuses here are +10, +˝. They give bonuses with one of the six styles of weapon (listed on page 36, table Skills.10). The last step is specified fighting. This skill gives a bonus of +15, +˝. It applies only to a specific type of weapon such as a broad sword, trident or a fist. Skills.10 lists some of the more popular specified skills, but any weapon can be chosen. All three of these weapon skills can be taken multiple times with cumulative effect. Lastly, a character must be classified in a style before he can specify in a weapon of that style.

Of the three offensive skills, bonuses are cumulative; so, a character using a broad sword will add up all his specified: broad sword modifiers, all his classified: slashing (or classified: bashing) modifiers, and all his generalized fighting modifiers to get his bonuses. Of course, Strength or Reflex bonuses will also apply, as well as possible magical weapon bonuses. Half points of damage are added together, all half points ( 2 ˝ ) are rounded down to a whole number ( 2 ).

The defensive primary weapon skill is parry. With parry, a character knows how to make proper use of a shield or other reactive defense. With this skill, the character is able to gain bonuses to his defense by employing bucklers and shields; without it, such items simply take up space. Furthermore, the parry skill teaches a character how to lessen the blows of an opponent. Actively parrying does cause the character to make sacrifices from his own attacks. By forfeiting ˝ an attack per series, he may inflict a -15 penalty to an opponent’s attack. The attack must be made against the one parrying. The loss of ˝ attack, means that the character could only attack once, every other series (assuming his normal attack sequence was once per series). The number of ˝ attacks sacrificed allow for multiple effects; thus, he could lose 1 attack per series in order to inflict a -30. Lastly, as with all primary weapon skills, parry can fill available weapon slots more than once, allowing cumulative effects. A character with three slots filled with parry can inflict a -45 penalty at the loss of only ˝ attack per series (or -90 at the loss of 1 attack per series).

The last type of weapon skill is a complementary skill. These are the tricks and special maneuvers of combat, such as disarming and two-handed fighting. On Pelicar, it is extremely difficult to perform a "trick" in combat without knowing how to do it. It is one thing to hold a weapon with each hand; it is entirely another to wield them simultaneously with the efficiency, balance and penuche as one would without the other hand in the way. Please note that these are level restricted. See page 37 for further details.

Finally, there is a very important rule to combat, which is difficult to find. This rule is the progression of the number of attacks per series. Base number of attacks is one per series. With daggers or fists, as they are such quick weapons, the base number of attacks is 3/2 (one attack the first series, two attacks the second). For every +75 from the bonuses that contribute to a particular weapon, the character gains an extra ˝ of an attack. 1 attack becomes 3/2 attack, 3/2 attack becomes 2 attacks. Attribute or other bonuses do not apply to the +75 bonus calculation.

  1. Based on the character’s aspirations, personality quirks, and perhaps simply survival, choose his trade skills. Good beginning skills are first aid, alertness, or endurance. If you know something about the situation your character will begin in, other skills may be just as valuable, such as foraging. If you expect to have funds and time available for further training, stealth and creature lore are good choices. If you are familiar with the Arbiter’s style, you might choose skills to fit, such as open locks. If the Arbiter agrees, you should discuss what the various characters are taking, if you are generating characters for a multi-player campaign.

Note: For demonstration purposes, if a character really wants a percent skill we recommend a bit of bargaining to allow them to start at a percent higher than five. If the character will leave one of their four open skill slots unfilled, let the percent skill start a 20%, two skills left blank would constitute a 30% and three a 40%.

The trade skills allow a player to really define or diversify his or her character. As with weapon skills, there are again several types of trade skills. Standard skills (table Skills.2, page 24) usually require no roll for success and no additional training. Once a standard skill is learned, the character knows everything there is to know within that skill description. Level base skills (table Skills.3, page 27) automatically improve as the character gains levels. There are only two listed in the OGB. Percent skills (table Skills.4, page 29) are generally lores, histories, production or thieving-type skills. These begin at a five percent (not very good), but at any time in a campaign setting the character can take time off from adventuring to train, provided he can afford it. In this fashion a character can improve himself without having to make a level. A character gains one trade skill per level. At fourth level a character will have four trade skills (plus his ancestral skill).

  1. Calculate the character’s awareness bonus. If any Senses bonus is given, write the plusses in the first box under Awareness. Each sentient being gains +1 per level in awareness bonuses. Lastly, any skills or magic which modify awareness can be placed in the last box. A full explanation of awareness can be found on page 42 of the OGB.
  2. If your character is of a spell-casting profession (only the conqueror is not), then determine your targeting bonuses. Use the character’s senses bonus. Add any skills which adjust the total targeting score. The "special" row is for any magical effects which might alter the targeting score. See MAGIC, Saves, page 58.

Note: It is not unusual for a mage at fourth level to have a low (1 or 2) score here.

  1. If your character is of a churchly profession, then choose the deity which your character will follow. Which deity is chosen will determine the incantations available to the character. See RELGION, page 123. Note that certain deities only allow certain professions to follow them.
  2. If your character is an axiom-caster, then ask your Arbiter to prepare a spell book. The Arbiter’s Aid software which is available at our web site (http://www.pelicar.info) will generate spell books. If your Mentality score does not permit you to know all the spells in your initial book, then choose which ones you have learned.

Note: An average 4th level character will have two books of up to 18 ranks a piece.

  1. In the space for devotion points write 6000. Congratulations, you now have a fourth level character!

Obviously, it is not our intent to rewrite the book. We’ve tried to make this a introduction to the mechanics of game play, but there is no substitute for reading the book. Of course, to prepare for a demonstration, you would not want to read a 200 page book. We recommend glancing through Part One and Part Two. These areas will expand upon what you have already read above and will show you some of the intricacies of the game. Awareness, initiative, and attack are certainly important sections you will need to know. Also, Part Five is an excellent reference if you are not familiar with running role-playing games.

The following pages have a sample adventure to run. It is designed for fourth level characters. In a four hour block, there is not much room to play through a detailed adventure, especially if the first one to two hours have been spent generating characters. The main purpose of our demo is to show the players the fluidity and cohesiveness of the combat and magic system. Therefore, the following scenario is primarily a series of combat encounters.

Demonstration Adventure

Setting: East Cabellette is one of the breadbaskets of Pelicar civilization, and home to the Mashituk religion. All the major races can be found in great numbers throughout the region. The southern half of East Cabellette is a pleasant land of forests and plains. Most of this area is civilized. The north is a barren place of deserts and dry grasslands. The Terivas Line is a distinct separation of the two tracts. The church of the Mashituk’s nature deity has made the expansion of this line a goal of the empire. They, along with other churches, invest huge amounts of their resources into pushing the Terivas Line north. For this project, progress is often measured in meters per year.

Theme: There is a distinct "wild west" culture along the line. Many border towns exist where mineral wealth or other resources can attract a middle class. Initially, leveled merchants and entrepreneurs move in and begin exploiting the wealth. Simultaneously, adventurers settle in to dislodge local creatures and take advantage of the inevitable disputes of business. Most active adventurers in these towns will range from third to sixth level, while higher level groups will use the towns as a base of operations. Magical abilities, such as teleport, allow groups over ninth level to maintain bases in more civilized towns.

Premise: The demo group is based in a small border town named Murloot. Population is about 200 (50 town guard/soldier types, 100 first to sixth level adventurers, and 50 merchants). The town’s big hope rests on coal and gem deposits in a nearby mountain range. The richest man in town (Ian, a second level human conqueror) owns the rights to mine the range. Mashituk business law gives him six months to get the operation going or lose the rights.

His plans are going well but he must see that a trade route to the coastal city of Tanirea is established, to ensure that the oversight committee will be pleased with his progress. For various reasons (feel free to make them up) he has chosen the players to spearhead this expedition. The group is to take a heavy wagon, supplied by Ian loaded with coal to Tanirea. In return the characters will receive 20,000 bits and can do whatever they desire with the coal, wagon and lizard steeds pulling it, once they get there. Also, they must report to his agent in Tanirea, to discuss problems along the trail, and check in with the oversight committee to confirm the trip was made.

If you wish to roll play the encounter with Ian, he has a fairly simple personality to run. Ian is business-like and accustomed to dealing with adventurers. He will not be intimidated by threats and the party will know he has at least four other adventuring groups working for him, who may take offense at having their employer threatened. Ian obviously expects the party to act on the up and up, but as standard procedure, he will point out his ability to hire mercenaries to track down anyone who violates a contract with him. By the way, such retaliation is perfectly legal and accepted under local adventuring law.

Encounter One (Sand Crab): After a long day of travel the party reaches an oasis. Upon inspection, there is no reason not to make this a campsite. There is nothing exceptional here and the party has passed several other oases during their trip. Of course, a monster lurks beneath the sands.

About 2:00 A.M. (second watch of a four watch system), any character awake should make an awareness check at -30 (-10 for moonlight and -20 for the crab’s special movement). Those who succeed (modified 75% or higher) may take actions in the first series against the sand crab that has just burst through the ground in the middle of camp. The crab chooses its targets completely at random (including sleeping victims and steeds), unless one is doing most of the damage. At the end of the first series, all characters who were asleep will make awareness checks (against the sounds of battle and thus with no penalty). Success means they may attack in the second series. Failure means they remain asleep, but may make an awareness check each following series until waking. If the party runs the sand crab will not pursue. The crab will fight to its death.

Sand Crab

Level

5

Size Type

IV

Climate/Terrain

Tropic, Temperate / Desert

Social Structure

Solitary

Commonality

Scarce

Encountered

1

Movement

50 MPM

Day

0 km / 22 km

Awareness Bonus

+15

Enemy

-20

Health

80 Avg. / 95 Max.

Defense

Base

54

Touch

73

Total

83

Special Defenses

None

Attack Bonus

+54

Attack Sequence

1

Additional Attacks

None

Start Series

Gore (12+3)

Alternate Series

Gore (12+3)

Physical Attributes

27

Mental Attributes

5

Pious Attributes

20

Treasure Class

None

Defeated

125

Encountered

0

Sand crabs are ground dwelling defenders of oases. They have a dozen legs and are nearly four meters across. They are basically disk shaped standing about one meter in height. Most of their time is spent underground. For totally unknown reasons, sand crabs have made it their duty to ensure oases are open to all who wish their comfort. If any being moves into the area for more than a day the beast will rise up out of the sand and attack.

Since the creature comes up from below, there is a penalty to all awareness checks against it. It’s approach is given away only by a slight trembling a few seconds before the attack. In attacking, the sand crab lunges toward it’s opponent once a melee series. It employs its forward, clawed legs and mouth as a powerful weapon. A successful strike does 15 points of damage.



Encounter Two (Spirit): In the afternoon of the second day of their journey, the team is approached by a messenger spirit. Awareness checks are not necessary as the creature will be extremely careful as not to surprise the group. Initially, it will go out of its way to let them know it is not hostile. The small spirit has been "hired" (see request, page 65) by a seventh level adventuring group operating in the area. The spirit has been paid to gather information on local troll activity. This is strictly a role playing encounter and can be easily ignored if your group is running behind schedule.

Spirits literally feed off of interaction with intelligent zoola (humanoids fall in this category). The spirit will be cheerful and try to drag the conversation out as long as possible (up to a couple hours). These creatures get brownie points for any information they can gather and send up the spirit "information superhighway," so it will not only ask about trolls, but about everything the group has been up to.

 

Messenger

Level

3

Size Type

II

Climate/Terrain

Any / Pervasive

Social Structure

Solitary

Commonality

Infrequent

Encountered

1

Movement

1000 MPM

Day

200 km / 700 km

Awareness Bonus

+23

Enemy

-65

Health

57 Avg. / 63 Max.

Defense

Base

48

Touch

54

Total

54

Special Defenses

Stealth

Attack Bonus

+15

Attack Sequence

1

Additional Attacks

None

Start Series

Tail (2+1)

Alternate Series

Tail (2+1)

Physical Attributes

24 (Stam: 33)

Mental Attributes

25

Pious Attributes

35

Treasure Class

1

Defeated

150

Encountered

0

Messenger spirits do the footwork in the great spirit communications network. They are constantly taking messages from greater spirits, to priests or other spirits. Each serves a specific emis or dakas. A few may be assigned to particularly powerful members of the church. They will only fight if their boss is in mortal danger, even then they prefer to run for help, if it is an intelligent option.

These small spirits are about a meter and a half in length, and very thin. Their heads and torsos are humanoid, but a full meter of their length consists of a tapered tail. They are naturally invisible. They actually have to concentrate to become visible, even at high speeds. They may communicate with any intelligent being. One of their 3 available trade skills will always be alertness, their stealth is natural. They may also communicate by telepathy, but with only one being at a time, at a range of one-hundred meters.



Encounter Three (Ogres): On the fourth day out, the group encounters a river. They could not have anticipated the size of the river before arriving here. No group that has adventured here has reported or even talked about the obstacle. If someone in the group has a tracking, hunting or similar skill they can immediately tell there is a path frequented by ogres along the river. After a few more minutes of investigation a skilled character can tell footprints indicate the village lies to the north. If no character has any such skill, you have two choices, let them wander or place the village which ever way they search (we suggest the latter).

In general, Mashituk relations with local ogre tribes are very good right now. There is regular trade with the major tribes and there has not been a raid for several months. The party should not assume the ogres will be hostile. In fact, since the group has been active in this area for a while, it is likely that they have been in ogre villages before -- certainly a place to watch your back, but not a party vs. the village situation.

Of course, in the great scheme of things, the ogres maintain a barge capable of transporting the wagon across the river. However, there are a lot of things that can happen from here, so I’ll suggest how the most likely player actions will pan out.

1. The party, fearing a village of 50 ogres, heads the other way. There simply is not another way to get the wagon across the river. Pick some 2nd, 3rd, and 4th level monsters and let the group play with the combat system.

2. The group goes in swinging. Realistically, they can’t win. About thirty of the ogres are full grown warriors as listed in description below. They are smart enough to grapple characters in heavy armor, or just tag team the party until they pass out from fatigue.

3. Night stealth mission. If someone has a sailing, small craft skill this can work. Obviously, the wagon cannot be moved quietly into camp. However, a group could cut the barge loose load it downstream and sail across. The ogres have had it pretty good recently and there is a 60% likelihood that all guards will be asleep on any given night. Feel free to adjust awareness checks appropriately for characters doing a good job or for messing around and being noisy. This is a good time to penalize or reward a group depending upon how well they stay in character.

Map

4. "They’re just ogres, lets talk." This is probably the most logical step. The ogres will gladly let the group use the barge, for 2000 bits. However, this encounter should be role-played because the ogre chieftain has taken a lot of grief from his warriors due to the lack of combat. The chief (80 Health) will be forced to fight any party member who insults or otherwise dishonors him in anyway. If uninvited party members join the fray a contingent of five loyal ogres will also join. The rest will wait and see. If the character(s) win, the ogres will unanimously elect whichever member of the group fought the best in combat to be their new chief. Furthermore, the character has absolutely no say in the matter. They will follow the character if he tries to leave camp. Eventually, the character should be able to escape his tribe, but this is an encounter to have some fun with. Also, this is may not be too bad for the group. If the ogres pick up camp and travel with the characters the rest of the way, then the scenario is effectively over. Nothing in the area is big enough or dumb enough to attack a caravan of forty or so ogres led by adventurers.

 

 

Ogre

Level

4

Size Type

III

Climate/Terrain

Any / Any

Social Structure

Group

Commonality

Unusual

Encountered

1-10

Movement

100 MPM

Day

50 km / 60 km

Awareness Bonus

+14

Enemy

+5

Health

60 Avg. / 80 Max.

Defense

Base

50

Touch

62

Total

67

Special Defenses

None

Attack Bonus

+54

Attack Sequence

1

Additional Attacks

Weapon

Start Series

Weapon (+8)

Alternate Series

Weapon

Physical Attributes

25 (Strength: 32)

Mental Attributes

20

Pious Attributes

15

Treasure Class

4

Defeated

120

Encountered

0

Ogres stand over two-and-a-half meters tall. They are pale skinned and heavily muscled. Ogres are hunters. They often trade pelts and meat to nearby civilizations for weapons. They will not hesitate to attack other humanoids for financial gain. Ogres generally begin combat by hurling a spear or two, then closing to melee. They prefer hand and a half weapons, looking to good damage without the delay. Among the less intelligent humanoids, ogres are actually the easiest to work with. They have a limited concept of honesty and friendship. Ogres occasionally hire out as mercenaries, expecting at least one-thousand bits a month.



Encounter Four (Lizards): After using the barge to cross the river, if the group is not accompanied by the ogres, they will be attacked by a group of Sual trail lizards on the sixth night of their trip. If the players dream of floating to the city via the river, remember the river is uncharted. Further, it would be insane to take the barge down the ocean coast. A sailor would recognize a river delta entering the ocean. Also, river travel is very dangerous. There is a 30% chance each day (60% change if trying to travel at night) of ramming a jutting river rock. Once ramming, there is a 50% chance of tearing a hideous hole in the barge, plus a 20% chance of capsizing, losing the wagon.

However, if the party crosses the river and travels on, the Sual trail lizards will attack. Follow the awareness check procedure in the sand crab encounter, except the awareness penalty is only -10 for moonlight. There are a total of 11 trail lizards. They have attacked the party because, from a distance, they look like merchants. Once the melee has begun, the lizards will quickly realize the are facing a party of adventurers. Beginning in the fourth series, the beasts will begin to run. However, before fleeing, those close to the wagon will attempt to set it on fire with their breath weapons. Each time one spits fire on the wagon, it must make a survival check against fire. As listed on page 143. There is a 65% chance that the wagon will catch on fire. During the first two series the fire will be fairly easy to put out (a couple buckets of water or a couple characters with blankets). Beyond that the fire will no longer be extinguishable by normal means.

 

Sual Trail Lizard

Level

3

Size Type

III

Climate/Terrain

Tropic, Temperate / Any

Social Structure

Group

Commonality

Infrequent

Encountered

(2-20)+5

Movement

120 MPM

Day

45 km / 50 km

Awareness Bonus

+23

Enemy

0

Health

48 Avg. / 60 Max.

Defense

Base

54

Touch

67

Total

72

Special Defenses

None

Attack Bonus

+34

Attack Sequence

3/2

Additional Attacks

Fire Breath

Start Series

Claw (6+3)

Alternate Series

Claw (6+3), Claw (6+3)

Physical Attributes

27

Mental Attributes

1

Pious Attributes

5

Treasure Class

1

Defeated

75

Encountered

0

The trail lizard resembles a small carnosaur. Ages ago they were an intelligent species favored by the gods of the time. But, there rose other races with their own ideas of civilization. These upstart races developed a money economy that led to fall of these once proud creatures. After thousands of years of devolution only a hatred of merchants links them to their roots.

The creatures have an uncanny ability to recognize sites important to trade. They often raid trading posts in the middle of the night, starting fires with their fiery breath and fleeing before local warriors can respond. In the wilds, they lair near trade routes, waiting for likely targets. Usually they attack at night, torching wagons, and attempting to quickly kill the merchants. If strong resistance is met they quickly retreat. If they outnumber the travelers, the lizards may make bold attacks with the intent of murdering all.

Their fiery breath is only usable once per hour; thus, in melee they use their powerful claw to attack. They gain 3/2 attacks. One claw, for 9 points, in the first melee series, two in the second, then back to one and so on. If they have not used their fire breath and are preparing to retreat, they will spit fire on their opponents. The limited burst only effects one creature for a potential of 20 points. The save is against Reflexes for damage. The lizards target at 2d10+3.



Encounter Five (Tanirea): Assuming the use of the barge, the party will reach Tanirea on the eighth day. If they have to circumvent the river, it will take them 27 days (and will not be considered an effective trade route). Role-playing the end of the scenario is by no means necessary. If you choose to continue, then the party is contracted see Ian’s agent and check in with the oversight committee. Obviously, if the wagon was lost or abandoned along the way, the agent will be very disappointed. He will insist on accompanying the party to see the committee, assuming they have not already met. If the party is convincing about the viability of the trade route, the committee will approve an extension of Ian’s monopoly, even if the wagon was lost during the encounter with the trail lizards. If the wagon was lost earlier, Ian is going to have to spend a lot of money in bribes. Lastly, if they do not check in with either the agent or the committee by the 30th day, there is a 30% chance that they will be assumed dead. Further, there is a 50% chance that divination spells and spiritual communication will reveal the truth about the party. Lastly, there is a 20% chance that Ian’s contacts will discover inaccurate and misleading information about the party.

Prologue: From here the party is posed to do almost anything. They could return to Murloot, book passage north to unexplored Pervaria, head south to civilization, or just stay in Tanirea. Have fun with your further adventures.